The Front Lines of Predictive Intelligence

This article was originally published on the Hubspot Blog by Infer customer, Nicholas Heim, Director of Inbound Marketing at Hotjar.

HotJar HubSpot

Hypergrowth SaaS businesses like my company, Hotjar, are often faced with the happy problem of too many free trial leads flooding into HubSpot. Thanks to lots of word of mouth buzz around our mission to democratize user analytics, and some clever advertising, we took off fast a couple years ago.

I wasn’t around for the early “fresh-out-of-beta days,” but as a newer team member, it’s quite nice to stand on the shoulders of an amazing product and founders who are true visionaries. When I joined around nine months ago, it had become challenging for our team to vet which leads (out of around 600+ new users each day) to target for premium business and agency plans.

While we get tons of value from using HubSpot for both our CRM and marketing automation needs, we couldn’t properly segment and personalize messages for our highest potential users out of the gate.

That is, until we added Infer Predictive Scoring to the mix. Now, we have a custom predictive model that works with HubSpot and our Intercom customer messaging platform to provide accurate data-based predictions of how well each lead matches Hotjar’s ideal customer.

Here’s what we’ve learned by using predictive intelligence to inform more advanced sales and marketing tactics.

Infer Launches New Predictive Behavior Scoring; Expands Sales Intelligence Capabilities

Press Release: Company Further Accelerates Product Innovation and Extends Open Ecosystem

Infer Inc., a leading predictive sales and marketing platform that helps companies win more customers, today announced several enhancements to its product portfolio. The latest improvements to Infer Glance, a sales and account intelligence application, as well as Infer’s new predictive behavior scoring for Salesforce Pardot, reflect the company’s strategy to continue deepening integrations with other enterprise systems. Infer’s open architecture makes it easy for sales reps and marketers to infuse predictive intelligence into their decision-making in order to close deals more quickly.

The significant product improvements we’ve made in 2016 reflect how we’re helping businesses reimagine automation through data science,” said Vik Singh, CEO and co-founder of Infer. “The market for AI solutions is rapidly expanding, and Infer fuels predictive adoption by serving as a guide that intelligently and continuously identifies revenue whitespace in a company’s funnel. In just a few years, I’m confident that every modern enterprise with a CRM system will also be leveraging predictive analytics and AI to supercharge its revenue growth.”

Infer Glance Sales Intelligence Powers More Productive Conversations

Why Atlassian will be a $50+ billion company in 10 years

This article was originally published on VentureBeat by Vik Singh, Co-Founder and CEO at Infer.

Atlassian Valuation

 

Recently, Atlassian made a very smart move by acquiring Trello. While $425 million implies a high multiple (given Trello’s revenue run rate was around $10 million last year), I believe it positions Atlassian to become the next big enterprise software company. I project it will reach a $50 billion market cap in 10 years by taking over software for teams. Here are four reasons why:

1. Product-driven culture

I am a long-time user of both Atlassian and Trello’s solutions, and one of the first things I noticed about these companies was that each of them took an entirely product-focused path to expansion. In particular, Atlassian’s rise over the past 15 years came on the strength of products like JIRA and Confluence, which won over developers by being good enough to sell themselves. In fact, the company prides itself on not having traditional sales reps, even though pretty much every other business software company employs an army of them. That’s incredibly impressive given Atlassian’s revenues and customer count. This company lives and dies on building products that work and sell themselves.

Its leadership reflects this product-centric view and is doing a great job building a long-lasting engineering and product culture. I’ve used LinkedIn data to run some numbers about Atlassian’s engineering retention, and computed how long it would take for the company to churn through all of its current software engineers (a “wipeout” period*). It’s currently at an impressive 29 years, which makes Atlassian’s development team more sustainable than those at buzzier companies like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twilio, and Dropbox.

This is probably a big part of the reason the company’s flagship product has become the industry standard, with tens of thousands of customers. With JIRA, Atlassian built a very extensible framework not just for product development but for prioritizing any project task or ticket and for creating automation via triggers and workflows. So much so that companies now use this platform for all types of use cases – at my company, we even use it to support our human resources and recruiting processes. Atlassian repurposed the platform as the foundation for JIRA Service Desk, a newer product that specializes JIRA for customer support and IT teams and is now its fastest growing product line.

Many people don’t realize that Trello has demonstrated the same product acumen as Atlassian. At first glance, some might think of a Trello board as just a “to do” list, but it’s much bigger than that (I’ll expand on this in a moment). The company nailed the details while not bloating the product, delivering key features like checklists, dates, assignments, power-ups (where you can link cards to pull in information from other SaaS systems), progress meters, labels, attachments, and new feeds, etc. With these capabilities, Trello has delivered a near-perfect agile/kanban experience while managing to make its core collaboration tools incredibly simple and intuitive.

Justin Norris of Perkuto on the State of B2B Advertising, How ABM is Making Outbound Cool Again, and Extending Marketo [Podcast]

This week, we’re joined by Justin Norris, Solutions Architect at Perkuto to talk about how his experience with hundreds of Marketo-based sales and marketing stacks has given him a unique perspective on sales automation, lead routing, and architecting solutions that string together many technologies and systems to do awesome things. Justin also chats with the hosts about his thoughts on B2B advertising and why ABM is making outbound cool again.